An argument against pain points - at least how they're typically used

 
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Why use pain points in a negative way?

Something has been on my mind for a while, but it’s just coming together now. Let’s talk pain points (and why this writer doesn’t focus on them as a negative thing)!

Before I jump into my stance on pain points, I need to be sure I tell you what I mean.

In my mind, and for others in the business world, a pain point is the reason a client hires a service provider or buys a product. A pain point is a struggle, a problem to be addressed. It’s a negative thing, no matter how you use it.

Isn’t the reason someone hires a service provider or buys a product because  they know there’s a problem or unpleasantness? They know that. And you know it too.

I dislike the tactic of leading with pain points explicitly, because I would prefer my clients (and potential clients) have positive associations with what I do, and how I do what I do for them. I want it to be a happy, easy experience. Not reminders of a struggle.

Pain points are reasons one might hire another person to do a job:

·        They might feel the lack the knowledge

·        They might feel the lack the skill

·        They might not feel they have the time

·        They might not have interest in doing the job they’re hiring out.

 

“But EVERYONE uses pain points!”


I know a lot of the “gurus” and business owners making thousands of dollars each month and getting all the attention use this formula. That may be because it’s pretty easy to remember, and it works.

I don’t feel like poking at pain points is a great way to position one’s business. At least, not for me. 

At Writing Unfiltered, I try not to rely too much on those things, because I strongly believe that focusing on the negative aspects of something makes it that much less enjoyable. Not only that, but focusing on the negative puts an unhappy energy into the content, and people can tell.  I know, that’s a little woo-woo, but those are the two biggest reasons I work and turning pain points into positive things, whether I’m writing for clients or writing for myself.   

So what can you do instead?

I can’t tell you what to do, but I can tell you what I do. I reframe the pain point, and refocus.

When I work with clients, I learn about their specific pain points, but I don’t frame my content with those as super obvious pieces of the content. I look at the pain points, and focus on the fix. That’s the positive that comes to others when they work with my clients or buy their products.

 Reframing content so that it keeps a client or customer’s reason in the message and focusing on benefits and positive things that come from a partnership between service provider and client creates a better feel.  The positive vibe comes through in the content one creates. This is part of what makes a piece of content memorable.

Wouldn’t you rather be remembered for something positive, instead of a focus on negative pain points?    

At Writing Unfiltered, I try not to rely too much on those things, because I strongly believe that focusing on the negative aspects of something makes it that much less enjoyable. Not only that, but focusing on the negative puts an unhappy energy into the content, and people can tell.  I know, that’s a little woo-woo, but those are the two biggest reasons I work and turning pain points into positive things, whether I’m writing for clients or writing for myself.   

Pain points are simply problems that a reader/customer/buyer has. You can use pain points without dwelling on the negative (even if that sounds counter-intuitive). More about that is coming in a future blog post.

How do you react when a business owner uses pain points as a marketing strategy?

Have questions on specifics in the process? Stick with me this month and you’ll find that information in my blog posts. If you don’t want to wait, feel free to send me an email and we can have a discussion.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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April Bamburg, Content Writer

 

My business is Writing Unfiltered. Writing is what I do. Unfiltered is the type of life I aspire to have.

I’m a little different from most people I know, partly because I find research delightful. I love learning about new topics in order to write about them.

Anyone you ask will tell you I drink too much coffee. They might also say I’m out of touch when it comes to pop culture. I definitely don’t jump into trendy topics until the buzz has died down. I like music people have never heard of, or is no longer popular. (Seriously. I just binge-watched Pretty Little Liars, The Fosters, and Parenthood this year. Don’t expect me to get into Game of Thrones.) But, I stick with what I like (New Kids on the Block will ALWAYS be on my playlist.)

April BamburgComment